Basic Setup

Installation instructions can be found on the Tutorial page.

Configuration

Radicale tries to load configuration files from /etc/radicale/config, ~/.config/radicale/config and the RADICALE_CONFIG environment variable. A custom path can be specified with the --config /path/to/config command line argument.

You should create a new configuration file at the desired location. (If the use of a configuration file is inconvenient, all options can be passed via command line arguments.)

All configuration options are described in detail on the Configuration page.

Authentication

In it’s default configuration Radicale doesn’t check user names or passwords. If the server is reachable over a network, you should change this.

First a users file with all user names and passwords must be created. It can be stored in the same directory as the configuration file.

The secure way

The users file can be created and managed with htpasswd:

# Create a new htpasswd file with the user "user1"
$ htpasswd -B -c /path/to/users user1
New password:
Re-type new password:
# Add another user
$ htpasswd -B /path/to/users user2
New password:
Re-type new password:

bcrypt is used to secure the passwords. Radicale requires additional dependencies for this encryption method:

$ python3 -m pip install --upgrade passlib bcrypt

Authentication can be enabled with the following configuration:

[auth]
type = htpasswd
htpasswd_filename = /path/to/users
# encryption method used in the htpasswd file
htpasswd_encryption = bcrypt

The simple but insecure way

Create the users file by hand with lines containing the user name and password separated by :. Example:

user1:password1
user2:password2

Authentication can be enabled with the following configuration:

[auth]
type = htpasswd
htpasswd_filename = /path/to/users
# encryption method used in the htpasswd file
htpasswd_encryption = plain

Addresses

The default configuration binds the server to localhost. It can’t be reached from other computers. This can be changed with the following configuration options:

[server]
hosts = 0.0.0.0:5232

More addresses can be added (separated by commas).

Storage

Data is stored in the folder /var/lib/radicale/collections. The path can be changed with the following configuration:

[storage]
filesystem_folder = /path/to/storage

Security: The storage folder should not be readable by unauthorized users. Otherwise, they can read the calendar data and lock the storage. You can find OS dependent instructions in the Running as a service section.

Limits

Radicale enforces limits on the maximum number of parallel connections, the maximum file size (important for contacts with big photos) and the rate of incorrect authentication attempts. Connections are terminated after a timeout. The default values should be fine for most scenarios.

[server]
max_connections = 20
# 1 Megabyte
max_content_length = 10000000
# 10 seconds
timeout = 10

[auth]
# Average delay after failed login attempts in seconds
delay = 1

Running as a service

The method to run Radicale as a service depends on your host operating system. Follow one of the chapters below depending on your operating system and requirements.

Linux with systemd as a user

Create the file ~/.config/systemd/user/radicale.service:

[Unit]
Description=A simple CalDAV (calendar) and CardDAV (contact) server

[Service]
ExecStart=/usr/bin/env python3 -m radicale
Restart=on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy=default.target

Radicale will load the configuration file from ~/.config/radicale/config. You should set the configuration option filesystem_folder in the storage section to something like ~/.var/lib/radicale/collections.

To enable and manage the service run:

# Enable the service
$ systemctl --user enable radicale
# Start the service
$ systemctl --user start radicale
# Check the status of the service
$ systemctl --user status radicale
# View all log messages
$ journalctl --user --unit radicale.service

Linux with systemd system-wide

Create the radicale user and group for the Radicale service. (Run useradd --system --home-dir / --shell /sbin/nologin radicale as root.) The storage folder must be writable by radicale. (Run mkdir -p /var/lib/radicale/collections && chown -R radicale:radicale /var/lib/radicale/collections as root.)

Security: The storage should not be readable by others. (Run chmod -R o= /var/lib/radicale/collections as root.)

Create the file /etc/systemd/system/radicale.service:

[Unit]
Description=A simple CalDAV (calendar) and CardDAV (contact) server
After=network.target
Requires=network.target

[Service]
ExecStart=/usr/bin/env python3 -m radicale
Restart=on-failure
User=radicale
# Deny other users access to the calendar data
UMask=0027
# Optional security settings
PrivateTmp=true
ProtectSystem=strict
ProtectHome=true
PrivateDevices=true
ProtectKernelTunables=true
ProtectKernelModules=true
ProtectControlGroups=true
NoNewPrivileges=true
ReadWritePaths=/var/lib/radicale/collections

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Radicale will load the configuration file from /etc/radicale/config.

To enable and manage the service run:

# Enable the service
$ systemctl enable radicale
# Start the service
$ systemctl start radicale
# Check the status of the service
$ systemctl status radicale
# View all log messages
$ journalctl --unit radicale.service

MacOS with launchd

To be written.

Classic daemonization

Set the configuration option daemon in the section server to True. You may want to set the option pid to the path of a PID file.

After daemonization the server will not log anything. You have to configure Logging.

If you start Radicale now, it will initialize and fork into the background. The main process exits, after the PID file is written.

Security: You can set the umask with umask 0027 before you start the daemon, to protect your calendar data and log files from other users. Don’t forget to set permissions of files that are already created!

Windows with “NSSM - the Non-Sucking Service Manager”

First install NSSM and start nssm install in a command prompt. Apply the following configuration:

Security: Be aware that the service runs in the local system account, you might want to change this. Managing user accounts is beyond the scope of this manual. Also make sure that the storage folder and log file is not readable by unauthorized users.

The log file might grow very big over time, you can configure file rotation in NSSM to prevent this.

The service is configured to start automatically when the computer starts. To start the service manually open Services in Computer Management and start the Radicale service.